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Watershed Watch Community Science

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  1. Watershed Watch Community Science
  2. Watershed Watch Methods
    Introduction & What is a Watershed?
    1 Quiz
  3. How Do I Collect Watershed Health Data?
    How to Measure Stream Chemistry?
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  4. What is an Benthic Macroinvertebrate, How to Sample, What do they tell us about Watershed Health?
    4 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  5. How do we Measure the Health of Riparian Areas
    7 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  6. How to Measure Streamflow?
    5 Topics
    |
    1 Quiz
  7. How to I Turn My Data Into Action?
    How to organize and interpret my data and develop findings?
  8. How to make a community presentation with my findings?
  9. How write a watershed management plan?
  10. We Calibrate Because We Care! ~ How to maintain and calibrate equipment
  11. How can I find work in the field of watershed science?
  12. How can I influence policymakers and turn my data into action?
Lesson 2 of 12
In Progress

Introduction & What is a Watershed?

July 23, 2020

Watersheds are naturally created units of land defined by landforms we find all around us, the ridges and peaks that separate surface water flows into different basins.  The arroyos, creeks, streams, and rivers that result at the lowest point in the basins are often connected to the lands higher in the watershed via spring fed groundwater.  Learning about your watershed is a way of having more information to help protect your water and security.  The three images below show different ways to draw a watershed with the two black and white ones showing the same Glorieta watershed.